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The Villages of the Yorkshire Wolds

Lowthorpe


The small Village of Lowthorpe is scattered across quiet an area due to its remoteness, elegant houses and farm buildings appear along the quiet country road off the A166.

During the 1900’s there was a railway station here which was a hive of activity. Post would be dropped off by the mail train at 7am every morning and then taken by horse and cart to the post office in the village. From there it would be taken by post men on bicycles to the outlying villages. They would return with outgoing mail which was put on the 6:20pm train bound for Hull.

The railway station closed many years ago and trains no longer stop at Lowthorpe, buildings once used for storage have now been renovated and are private residences, the old post office is now also a private house. Automatic barriers nowadays police the crossing

St Martin’s Church stands behind high conifers, which have grown tall over the years giving it a dark and gloomy appearance as you, walk up the path towards it. It is believed to have been built in 1333, when the church was made collegiate by Sir John de Heslerton and housed six chaplains and three clerks. The college survived until its dissolution in 1579, when it declined in status to a Parish Church.

The chancel now is open to the skies but the church remains supported and used today. There is a strange family tomb on the left as you enter the church, which depicts a man and a woman in flowing robes. A tree appears to grow over them and from the branches of the trees are thirteen children’s heads, seven on the mans side, six on the women’s side. The tomb is thought to represent Sir John Heslerton who originated from near by Rudston Parva and is believed to date back to the 14th Century.

The Church inside is very simple and has a high, wood beamed ceiling. The simplicity echoes the simple and peaceful life in this area of the Wolds.

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