The Wold Wide Web

The Digital Community for The Yorkshire Wolds

Aike
Atwick
Bainton
Barmston
Beeford
Beswick
Bewholme
Brandesburton
Brigham
Burton Agnes
Burton Flemming
Butterwick
Cottam
Cowlam
Cranswick
Dalton Holme
Dringhoe
Duggleby
Dunnington
Eastburn
Elmswell
Emmotland
Fimber
Fordon
Foston-on-the-Wolds
Foxholes
Fridaythorpe
Garton-on-the-Wolds
Gembling
Gransmoor
Haisthorpe
Harpham
Helperthorpe
Hempholme
Huggate
Hutton
Kelk
Kelleythorpe
Kilham
Kilnwick
Kiplingcotes
Kirkburn
Langtoft
Lissett
Little Driffield
Lockington
Lowthorpe
Lund
Middleton-on-the-Wolds
Nafferton
Neswick
North Dalton
North Frodingham
Octon
Rotsea
Rudston
Ruston Parva
Scorborough
Skerne
Skipsea
Sledmere
Southburn
Sunderlandwick
Thixendale
Thornholme
Thwing
Tibthorpe
Tophill Low
Towthorpe
Ulrome
Wansford
Warter
Watton
Weaverthorpe
Wetwang
Wilfholme
Wold Newton

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The Yorkshire Wolds

Introduction

The beautiful, peaceful Yorkshire Wolds stretch leisurely from the chalk cliffs at Flamborough to the Humber Estuary at Hessle. They curve the land in a loving crescent shape and take in a huge area rich in history, colour, interesting people and beautiful buildings. There are some of the most picturesque villages and lively market towns in the country in this area, some well known, some well off the beaten track.

There is much to see and do in the area but the Wolds has an open and uncommercial feel to it that attracts both the young and the old. The gentle hills make it an ideal area for both walking and cycling.

The highest point in the Wolds is at the top of Garrowby Hill which is situated on the A166 and rises to a height of 800 feet above sea level at this point. "The Wolds Way " is a walk which can be done in sections and takes in beautiful scenery right across the Wolds, all routes clearly marked and details can be obtained from Tourist Information Offices or from local Ordinance Survey maps.

There are magnificent Halls to see such as Burton Agnes Hall, Sledmere House and Burnby Hall with its famous collection of water lilies. Also there are churches to visit in most of the parishes, some with most unusual hallmarks!

The landscape shows dramatic contrasts from the rugged cliffs along the Heritage Coastline to the peaceful seaside resort of Hornsea, and from the grey banks of the River Humber to the rich and colourful patch work quilt effect of the vast country landscape.!

The majority of the land is farmed with crops grown such as wheat, barley, oil seed rape and potatoes. These crops whilst growing add to the colourful landscape in late spring and early summer. A landscape which changes with the season.

 

The well drained chalk land on which The Wolds sits coupled with the calcium rich soil make it a heaven for beautiful wild flowers to grow. Cowslips, poppies, buttercups and daisies all grow in abundance along with sweet cicely, hemlock and fennel. All these wild plants in turn attract a wide selection of butterflies and birds, Red Admiral and a variety of Fritillary, Chaffinches, wrens, blue tits and great tits to name but a few. Also on your travels you will encounter much wildlife including rabbits and weasels, stoats and field mice. On a rare occasion you may be lucky to see some of the wild deer which still roam around areas of our countryside.

All in all the Wolds is an area of great beauty and great interest with much to see and do and much to offer our welcomed visitors.

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Copyright MSH 1999
The rolling landscape of the Wolds at Weaverthorpe

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The Magnificent Burton Agnes Hall

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The Norman Church at Garton on the Wolds

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Nafferton Mere

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St Peters Church, Hutton

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