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The Villages of the Yorkshire Wolds

Scorborough


The beautiful elegant spire St Leonard’s Church rises out of the trees that surround it giving the busy commuter who passes by on the A164 a glimpse of the ornate building whos walls and windows are richly carved.

The church was rebuilt in the 19th Century by John Pearson and was paid for by James Hall who resided at Scorborough Hall at that time as "a thank you offering for many blessings". The tower of made up of five pinnacles and is lavishly decorated inside with coloured floor tiles, double columns of marble separate the chancel and the nave. There is beautifully carved stonework everywhere from the font to the clock face.

The Manor House stood near to St Leonard’s in the 17th Century complete with a moat and was occupied by Sir John Hotham, the first baronet. He was renowned as the Governor of Hull who closed the city gates on Charles I and refused to let Royal’s enter even when the King himself appeared. It later transpired that he had been plotting with the Royalists to surrender Hull and as a consequence was beheaded at The Tower of London in 1645. His fortified Manor house was ravaged by the roundheads and subsequently destroyed. Only traces of the moat are visible today and it is dry. A stately looking property stands near to the site of the original house today but is much more in the cottage style than that of a Manor House.

Horses and cattle graze in paddocks in this quiet little village which is made up of a few houses and farms dotted along a no through road which is little more that a track.

Tranquillity seems to ascend once you turn off the main road into the village and with beautiful properties to see this really is a little village steeped in history.

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Copyright 1999 MSH Photography

ÓMSH 1999



All Images Copyright
MSH Photography Ó1999


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